Haftorah Trope

Copr. 2009 Rabbi Noah Gradofsky and Harry Sealine

Torah and Haftorah trope represent the tune that is sung when reading the Torah and Haftorah. The trope mark indicates both the tune to be sung, as well as where the emphasis/musical note is on the word (usually the emphasis is on the last syllable). Each set of trope indicates a distinct thought/phrase in the sentence. Each word has its own trope. Words with a hyphen are treated as one word.

This page teaches the common Trope combinations (as well as some notes that are generally on their own). Click the play buttons (or the alternative) to hear each combination sung in Haftorah trope (Torah trope sounds different). The trope on this page are sung by Harry Sealine. Please note that your computer may block the play button. If you get a warning saying that something hase been blocked (active-X, for example), you will have to tell your computer to allow this content.

Click here to download a pdf with these common trope combinations (the images you see below are copied from the pdf).

Click here for a review page (with the name and sound of all trope, except the extremely rare notes, in a single file).

If you would like to download this web page, including all graphic and sound files, (will run faster in the future) cick here. Run the program, which will allow you to install all the files into a directory on your computer. Then, simply open the local copy of "haftorah_trope.html" in your browser.

Two excellent resources for learning Torah and Haftorah reading are Navigating the Bible, which includes recordings of all Torah and Haftorah readings, and Ellie's Torah/Haftorah Trope Tutor.

 

 


Common Trope Combinations


Basic Beginning/Middle of Sentence

One of these combinations appear in all but the shortest sentences. The Etnachta represents the major middle point of a sentence.
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The End of a Sentence

Sof pasuk means "end of sentence". One of these combinations appears at the end of every sentence (with very rare exceptions). There will be only one sof pasuk per sentence.
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Note that at the end of a Torah aliyah or at the end of a Haftorah reading, the final sentence sounds a little different to signal the end of the reading. Typically, the changes begin with the tipcha and involve a significant flourish on the sof pasuk. Tthere are many different styles for this flourish. Click below to hear one style.
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Mahpach Pashtah Munach Zakef Katon

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Yetiv Munach Zakef Katon

Yetiv replaces Mahpach PashtahGenerally, the emphasis on a Yetiv will be at the beginning of the word.
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Munach Zarkah Munach Segol

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Darga Tevir

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Munach Munach Revi'i

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Kadmah V'Azlah

Note that where where the Kadmah precedes V'Azlah, it sounds a little different than when it precedes a Mahpach Pashtah. When it precedes Mahpach Pashtah, the Kadmah sounds just like Pashtah.
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Other Common Trope


Zakef Gadol

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Gershayim

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Pazer

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Telisha Ketanah

Note that the major difference between Telisha Ketanah and Telisha Gedolah is that the Telisha Ketanah has 5 differentiated notes, whereas the Telisha Gedolahhas seven differentiated notes.
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Telisha Gedolah

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Extremely Rare Trope


Mercha Kefulah

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Reminder: Click here for a review page (with the name and sound of all trope, except the extremely rare notes, in a single file).